State Of Bligh’s Terraces [Street Plan, Newtown, NSW]
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State Of Bligh’s Terraces [Street Plan, Newtown, NSW]

1847. Pencil, ink and watercolour on paper, backed with linen, titled in ink upper right, dated “April 27th 1847” and annotated in pencil upper left, captioned “Plan of Bligh Terrace” in ink verso, 33 x 41.5cm. Six separate panels, laid down on linen.

Annotation reads “Portion of the original Camperdown Estate purchased by Eagen[?].” Plan shows Missenden Road joining Newtown Road, later renamed King Street, and Bligh Street now named Carillon Avenue. A number of the lots show the names of the owners, including Grimshaw, Cannon, Byrnes, Chappel, Martin, Etherington, and Scott. Provenance: Daniel Cooper estate.

This area was part of the first subdivision and land sale in the Camperdown/Newtown area in Sydney. It was originally owned by William Bligh, who was granted 240 acres when he became governor in 1805. Bligh named the area after the Battle of Camperdown (Camperduin, a village in Holland) in which his ship played a “prominent role” with the British in the defeat of the Dutch in 1797. The area was later subdivided in 1842 by Bligh’s daughter Mary. Considered to be a controversial figure, hostile towards opponents of her father, she was married to Maurice O‘Connell who would become acting governor in 1846. Ref: Wiki; City of Sydney; Baskerville, South Sydney Heritage Society, 1997.

Daniel Cooper (1785–1853) was a pardoned convict who amassed a fortune in the 1820s through real estate and various business interests including whaling, sealing, shipping, and the export of Australian wool, mostly through the trading firm known as Cooper and Levey’s. The firm acquired John Piper’s estate when it was sold, comprising over 1100 acres at Woollahra and Rose Bay; Cooper also owned parts of Liverpool. He later became involved in the banking business, becoming a governor of the Bank of NSW in 1828. Ref: ADB.

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Item #CL198-166

Price (AUD): $6,600.00  other currencies

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